Programme 2021

/ Archive 2021

Programme 2021



October 13, 2021,
09:00 –10:15

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall A

The Russian Fuel and Energy Sector in a Time of Transition

The international climate agenda is compelling many countries to reform their carbon-based energy systems. For Russia, which holds a leading position in global hydrocarbon markets, the transition to development to low greenhouse gas emissions presents a serious challenge, but it also opens up new opportunities for economic growth based on renewable energy, hydrogen technologies, advanced processing of raw materials and the implementation of green projects. In the new reality, a number of major companies in the Russian fuel and energy sector have already begun to implement projects aimed at transitioning, viewing them not only as a contribution to global sustainable development, but also as way to improve their image and increase levels of trust amongst partners. At the same time, reducing the carbon component of the fuel and energy sector requires large-scale investment. How will the energy transition affect the development of the Russian fuel and energy sector? Have industry players shown a willingness to invest in the future utilizing the green financing market mechanisms? Can the government help create incentives to expand ESG business practices?

Moderator:
Elena Lazko — Partner, Head of Strategy and Operations, KPMG CIS

Panellists:
Roman Berdnikov — First Deputy General Director, Member of the Management Board, RusHydro
Tatiana Zavyalova — Senior Vice President for ESG (Environmental, Social, and Corporate Governance), Sberbank
Sergey Kudryashov — Director General, Zarubezhneft
Tore Morten Loeseth — Senior Vice President for Exploration and Production International, Country Manager for Russia, Equinor
Pavel Sorokin — Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation
Mikhail Sukhov — General Director, Analytical Credit Rating Agency

Front row participants:
Sergey Donskoy — Member of the Board of Directors, Irkutsk Oil Company (INK)
Valery Seleznev — First Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Energy of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation


October 13, 2021,
09:00 –10:15

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall B

The Impact of Europe’s Green Pivot on Russian-European Cooperation in Energy

Europe’s green shift doesn’t just mark a new direction in EU climate policy, but also a radically different economic approach that will have far-reaching consequences for its key trade and economic partners, including Russia. The EU's target of achieving carbon neutrality by 2050 means a revision to the paradigm of cooperation between Russia and Europe, including in the energy sector, which was based on Russia’s significant role in ensuring the energy security of the European Union and the significant contribution of European investors to the development of the Russian fuel and energy sector. Russia ranks fourth globally in terms of carbon dioxide emissions, but has enormous potential to develop carbon-neutral energy sources as well as ecosystems with significant absorptive capacity. In view of this, the country has something to offer international partners both in terms of combined efforts to combat climate change and the development of new segments of industry. The creation of favourable conditions for investment and innovation, the search for new areas of technological cooperation and the alignment of national carbon regulation systems all appear far preferable to restrictive measures, and will bring benefits to all parties. Joint efforts can on the one hand help to reduce the carbon footprint of European companies in Russia, and on the other hand could bring Russia closer to the transition to a greener economy in line with global trends. What is the development trajectory of the energy transition in Russia and Europe to 2030? How can high levels of energy security be ensured when a departure from the hydrocarbon economy is already inevitable? What challenges and risks does the Russian energy sector face as a result of current energy policy? What financial resources are available to businesses hoping to implement decarbonization projects? What successful examples of energy companies adapting to the new market conditions can offer a positive signal for other industry players? What effect will the global energy transformation have on the labour market? What is the role of universities in training specialists for the new professions that will be required in order to implement the energy transition?

Moderator:
Ernesto Ferlenghi — Chairman of the Energy Committee, Chairman of the Steering Committee of the Green Initiative Project, Association of European Businesses (АЕВ)

Panellists:
Alexey Kulapin — General Director, Russian Energy Agency (REA) of the Ministry of Energy of Russia
Fawad Quraishi — Vice President for Safety, Labor Protection, Industrial Safety, Environmental Protection and Sustainable Development, Equinor
Ivan Lobanov — Rector, Plekhanov Russian University of Economics
Giuseppe Ricci — Chief Operating Officer Energy Evolution, Eni
Sergey Tverdokhleb — Deputy General Director for Special Projects and External Relations, MCC EuroChem
Ferenc Horvath — Special Envoy to the Chairman, MOL Group
Markus Ederer — Ambassador of the European Union to the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Konstantin Dolgov — Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Economic Policy of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Alexey Knizhnikov — Head of the Responsible Industry Programme, World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Russia
Aleksey Matveev — Deputy Chairman of the Board, Gazprombank


October 13, 2021,
09:00 –10:15

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall C

A Hydrogen-Driven Future for Russia and the World: Dialogue with Business

In partnership with Metalloinvest

Many traditional global energy players are now competing in a hydrogen race. According to forecasts from the Russian Energy Agency of the Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation, additional global demand for hydrogen may reach 40–170 million tons per year by 2050, signaling the creation of a promising new market. Over 30 countries including Russia have developed their own hydrogen strategies in order to secure their positions. In the case of Russia, the government has set its sights on realizing the country’s potential in the production, export and use of hydrogen as well as establishing Russia as a global leader in its production and exports. Potential hydrogen export volumes from Russia could reach 200,000 tonnes by 2024, 2 million to 12 million tonnes by 2035 and 15 million to 50 million tonnes by 2050. The cornerstone of the new industry is technology, which is only just beginning to be actively developed. What technologies does hydrogen energy require to be produced efficiently, and when will Russian products enter the global market? What projects are already being implemented in the country, and how could this act as a springboard to help build new export markets in a short space of time? What are the opportunities for international cooperation in hydrogen energy, especially in technology transfer, joint ventures and infrastructure projects?

Moderator:
Oleg Zhdaneev — Deputy General Director - Head of Import Substitution in Oil and Energy Complex Competence Center, Russian Energy Agency of the Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Abderrezak Benyoucef — Head of Energy Studies Department, Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries
Yury Gavrilov — Strategy and M&A Director, METALLOINVEST LLC
Alisher Kalanov — Head of the Investment Division, RUSNANO
Anton Maximov — Director, Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis. A.V. Topchieva of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Anton Moskvin — Vice President for Marketing and Business Development, Rusatom Overseas

Front row participants:
Vladimir Rogov — Managing Director, Partner, BCG
Dmitry Kholkin — Director, Infrastructure Center Energinet, North-West Strategic Research Center Foundation; Deputy Head of the Working Group, EnergyNet NTI
Kentaro Hosomi — Executive Vice President & Chief Regional Officer EMEA, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd


October 13, 2021,
09:00 –10:15

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall D

The Fuel Revolution in the Transport Sector: A Focus on the Environment

The transport sector is one of the key contributors to the greenhouse gases emissions, driving the search for environmentally acceptable solutions to ensuring mobility of the society. The main “revolution” underway is in the electric transportation, yet the nascent stage of the charging infrastructure in Russia is cooling the internal demand for electric vehicles. Russia recently launched a state programme for the development of electric transport, including new measures to boost demand, support the production of vehicles and develop related infrastructure. Another support programme promotes the use of natural gas, including LNG, as a motor fuel. This programme is also focusing on the development of refuelling infrastructure and has received widespread support from oil and gas industry. The final, less developed alternative is hydrogen, where global and Russian manufacturers are collaborating to engineer hydrogen fuelled cars, and the government is considering a federal project entitled ‘The Electric Car and the Hydrogen Car’. How can an effective implementation of the government programmes be ensured and how can the profitability of infrastructure investment be achieved for all market participants? What are the key difficulties encountered by the megacities and regions, and how can they be dealt with? How can the adoption of environmentally friendly transport for both public and corporate needs be accelerated?

Moderator:
Denis Deryushkin — Deputy General Director - Head of Analytical Center, Russian Energy Agency of the Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Ayed Al-Qahtani — Director, Research Division, Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC)
Dmitriy Belyaev — General Director, Hydroinvest; Director of Strategic Transactions Department, RusHydro
Beatrice Buffon — Group Senior Executive Vice-President, International Division, EDF
Zoya Kaika — Deputy Director General, SOLLERS
Maksim Kolesnikov — Director of the Department for Economic Sectors, Ministry of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Konstantin Kravchenko — Acting Deputy General Director for Digital Transformation, Rosseti
Anton Rubtsov — Director of Oil Refining and Gas Complex Department, Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation

Front row participant:
Daria Kozlova — Director of Consulting in the Fuel and Energy Complex State Regulation Field, VYGON Consulting


October 13, 2021,
11:00 –12:15

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall A

Oil Production in Russia: A Star or Cash Cow?

Russia’s oil industry is not only a key revenue generator for the federal budget, it also drives social and economic activity in the regions. The taxation system needs to be overhauled to allow for production to remain in places where people live, while ensuring that new areas of activity and new regions are developed. Is it possible to create a long-term taxation system for greenfield and brownfield sites that can withstand at least a decade of changes to macroeconomic and price factors as well as short-term budgetary requirements?

Moderator:
Grigory Vygon — Managing Director, VYGON Consulting

Panellists:
Pavel Zavalny — Chairman of the Committee on Energy of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation; President, Russian Gas Society
Pavel Sorokin — Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation


October 13, 2021,
11:00 –12:15

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall B

Net Zero by 2050: New Opportunities for International Cooperation

The climate agenda is set to have a major impact on the German and Russian economies in medium and long term. On the one hand, the EU Green Deal and the prospect of accelerated decarbonisation pose a threat to supply of Russian products with a large carbon footprint to the EU. Meanwhile, the introduction of the new carbon regulations have mixed effect on the German economy as well, as it hugely dependent on the supply of raw materials from third countries. On the other hand, developments in the global climate policy could serve as a powerful impetus for the modernization of various sectors of the Russian economy and create new opportunities for Russian–European cooperation. This session will explore the economic and non-economic effects of the Russian and German carbon policies, as well as the main directions of Russian–German cooperation to address the climate change.

Moderator:
Matthias Schepp — Chairman, Russian-German Chamber of Commerce; Delegate of the Delegation of German Industry and Commerce in the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Darya Borisova — Managing Director for Development and Innovations, SIBUR
Sergey Machekhin — Deputy General Director Project Engineering and International Cooperation, RusHydro
Andreas Feicht — State Secretary, Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, Federal Republic of Germany
Kristina Haverkamp — Managing Director, German Energy Agency (dena)
Alexander Sharabaika — Member of the Management Board, Deputy General Director for Finance and International Projects, PhosAgro
Evgeny Shvarts — Head, Center for Responsible Nature Management of the Institute of Geography of the Russian Academy of Sciences; Doctor of Geographical Sciences, Distinguished Ecologist of the Russian Federation


October 13, 2021,
11:00 –12:15

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall C

The Energy Transition in the Housing Utilities Sector and Government Support of Utilities Infrastructure Modernization Programmes

In partnership with Housing and Public Utilities Reform Support Fund

In an age of a global energy transition, the utility sector is faced with the tasks of saving energy and increasing energy efficiency throughout the country. The depreciation of the majority of utilities infrastructure facilities – water supply, heat supply, and water treatment networks and systems – currently exceeds 60%. The housing utilities sector is third worst offender across all sectors with regard to environmental pollution due to excessive power and heat consumption. A large-scale, systematic to modernize the housing utilities industry is required: one based in modern, energy-efficiency, and safe technologies. This session will discuss strategic modernization targets and the development of power utilities, lessons learned from the use of alternative and renewable energy sources in the housing and utilities complex, prospects for reducing environmental impact and developing carbon-free power in the utilities sector, and conditions for the provision of government support.

Moderator:
Sergey Sivaev — Professor at the Faculty of Urban and Regional Development, National Research University Higher School of Economics

Panellists:
Petr Bobylev — Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation
Irina Bulgakova — Head of the Housing and Utilities Commission of the Public Council of the Ministry of Construction, Housing and Utilities of the Russian Federation
Evgeny Gasho — Head of the Research Laboratory for Methodological Problems of Energy Saving, National Research University "Moscow Power Engineering Institute"
Alexander Lomakin — First Deputy Minister of Construction, Housing and Communal Services of the Russian Federation
Ilya Minyaev — Program Manager "Improving Urban Housing Efficiency and Financing Facilitation for Building Modernization in the Russian Federation", World Bank
Olga Serdyuk — Deputy General Director, Housing and Public Utilities Reform Support Fund
Vladimir Sidorenko — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Sakhalin Region


October 13, 2021,
11:00 –12:15

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall D

Small Modular Reactors, Energy Supply for Regions and Industry Sector

In partnership with State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM

The world is moving from a traditional energy system to a modern ecosystem, when it is necessary to be flexible, follow the principles of responsible consumption and protect the environment. And the fundamental question is how the energy supply and the base load in the network, incl. in remote and hard-to-reach areas will be achieved. The solution is a balanced energy mix including various types of generation and technological breakthroughs. What role can be assigned to low carbon energy sources, including nuclear power, in addressing the issue of providing stable electricity for various consumers? What prospects do small modular reactors have and what should be done to make them available for sustainable energy supply to regions and industry?

Moderator:
Sergey Brilev — Anchor; President, The Global Energy Association

Panellists:
Evgeniy Grabchak — Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation
Alexey Likhachev — Director General, State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Aysen Nikolaev — Head of Sakha Republic (Yakutia)
Oleg Novachuk — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Mining company Baimskaya
Angela Wilkinson — Secretary General, Chief Executive Officer, World Energy Council (WEC)
Mikhail Chudakov — Deputy Director General, Head of the Department of Nuclear Energy, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)


October 13, 2021,
13:00 –15:00

Manege, 1st floor, Plenary conference hall

Plenary Session

Address by the President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin

Video address:
João Lourenço, President of Angola, which is chairing the OPEC conference in 2021

Moderator:
Hadley Gamble, Anchor, CNBC

Speakers:
Ola Källenius, Chairman of the Board of Management of Daimler AG and Mercedes-Benz AG
Bernard Looney, Chief Executive Officer, BP
Patrick Pouyanne, Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, TotalEnergies
Darren Woods, Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, Exxon Mobil Corporation

October 13, 2021,
16:30 –17:45

Manege, 1st floor, Plenary conference hall

Global Challenges and Opportunities in Electric Power

In 2016 the Paris Agreement on climate change, which aims to provide a framework and objectives for governments around the world to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and thereby contribute to a reduction in average global temperatures, was adopted by 196 parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, including Russia. The world has already set about implementing it in practice, and many countries have declared carbon neutrality goals, which they are working towards by rapidly developing new energy technologies, electric transport and renewable energy. In 2020 alone, around 280 GW of wind and solar power was commissioned globally. By 2030, around 1,000 GW of renewable energy capacity is expected to be commissioned each year. Russia supports global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, with over 80% of the country’s electricity generated from sources with a low greenhouse gas emission factor, including hydroelectric power plants, nuclear power plants, combined-cycle power plants, and combined heat and power generation. The share of solar and wind generation in the country's electricity mix remains very low, though this does mean that there is huge potential for further reducing the Russian electric power industry’s carbon intensity. What is the carbon intensity of the Russian electric power industry compared with Europe? How far can the Russian and global renewable energy sector be scaled up in the decades to 2050? What are the capabilities of hydroelectric power plants in contributing to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions? What are the future prospects for nuclear energy?

Moderator:
Alexandra Suvorova — Anchor, Russia 24 TV Channel

Panellists:
Olga Algayerova — Executive Secretary, United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE)
Bento Albuquerque — Minister of Mines and Energy, Federative Republic of Brazil
Alparslan Bayraktar — Deputy Minister of Energy and Natural Resources of the Republic of Turkey
Kirill Komarov — First Deputy General Director, Director of the Development and International Business Unit, ROSATOM State Atomic Energy Corporation
Andrey Ryumin — General Director, Chairman of the Management Board, Rosseti
Nikolay Shulginov — Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Karim Amin — Executive Vice President for Generation, Siemens Energy AG
Anton Usachev — Director, Russian Solar Energy Association; PR Director, Hevel Group


October 13, 2021,
16:30 –17:45

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall A

Russia-2060: Perspectives of Green Energy

Today, the fuel and energy sector is facing an ambitious decarbonization task, involving large-scale challenges. Among other things, there is a need for national regulation of greenhouse gas emissions, an increase in renewable energy generation, large-scale electrification and digitalization of transport, the introduction of technology for capturing, storing and processing carbon dioxide. And this is only part of what will need to be done for the energy transition. Is it possible to make certain branches of the fuel and energy complex "green" and what should be done in this regard? What are the barriers and would it be possible to overcome them by 2060? Can the energy transition in Russia towards green energy become the basis for economic growth?

Moderator:
Alexander Vedyakhin — First Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank

Panellists:
Roman Berdnikov — First Deputy General Director, Member of the Management Board, RusHydro
Alexandra Panina — Member of the Management Board, Inter RAO; Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Council of Power Producers
Alexey Russkih — Governor of Ulyanovsk Region
Pavel Sorokin — Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation
Angela Wilkinson — Secretary General, Chief Executive Officer, World Energy Council (WEC)


October 13, 2021,
16:30 –17:45

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall B

Defense Industry and the Fuel and Energy Sector Inter-Enterprise Collaboration for Import Substitution and Technological Development

Ensuring the national technological sovereignty of Russia’s fuel and energy sector is one of the key prerequisites for the country's energy security and economic growth today. In order to support the continued transition of the Russian energy sector to the use of domestic high-tech products, cooperation between industry players and enterprises within the defense industry must be strengthened. Boosting mutually beneficial interaction between the industries will allow the fuel and energy sector to reduce its need for products that are critical for sustainable development, while supporting the defense industry’s efforts to diversify production in the face of reduced state defense procurement orders and build up competencies in civilian sectors. Successful examples of cooperation in this area already exist. Defense industry companies are currently fulfilling existing agreements, sharing sought-after solutions for the exploration and production of hydrocarbons, including hard-to-recover oil reserves. At the same time, there is still huge potential for the development of partnerships involving cross-sector cooperation, as well as new approaches to eliminating financial, human and technological risk. What examples of successful cooperation between the fuel and energy sector and the defense industry can be identified and considered for expansion? What are the future prospects for cooperation, and is there a business model that makes it possible to use the defense industry's competencies in the best possible interests of the fuel and energy sector? What government support measures are needed in order to accelerate diversification?

Moderator:
Oleg Zhdaneev — Deputy General Director - Head of Import Substitution in Oil and Energy Complex Competence Center, Russian Energy Agency of the Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Grigory Gladkovsky — Deputy Chief Engineer, Rosseti
Yevgeny Gribov — Director, Department of Engineering for the Fuel and Energy Industry, Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Georgy Kalamanov — Deputy Director, Development and International Business Unit, Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation
Igor Moiseev
Yury Solomonov — General Designer for the Development of Strategic Missile Systems, Moscow Institute of Heat Engineering Corporation
Vitaly Shevtsov — Director, Diversification Centre, Roscosmos State Corporation for Space Activities


October 13, 2021,
16:30 –17:45

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall C

Emerging Challenges for the Chemical Industry: The Climate Agenda

In partnership with SIBUR Holding

The chemical industry is a driver of industrial growth and one of the fastest growing global economic sectors, with a growth rate of 1.2 times that of GDP. Polymer production has increased by 50% globally over the last decade. The use of chemical products makes it possible to respond quickly and effectively to global challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic, thereby contributing to the industry’s continued sustainable growth. In recent years, Russian chemical companies have opened up a large number of new production facilities focused primarily on meeting the needs of the domestic market and the import substitution programme for basic chemical products. The projects currently being implemented (Amur Gas Processing Plant, Nizhnekamskneftekhim, Baltic Chemical Complex and Irkutsk Oil Company among others) will make a significant contribution to growth in Russia’s non-resource non-energy exports. The realization of the sector’s potential is being achieved thanks to the government’s effective system of long-term incentives. One of the key challenges facing the global and Russian chemical industries, however, is the climate agenda. Thanks to their unique functional characteristics, chemical products play an important role in efforts to protect the environment by reducing resource consumption and carbon emissions compared with products made from traditional materials. On the other hand, tightening environmental state regulations are forcing chemical companies to increasingly redirect their projects towards sustainable development objectives. What strategies are chemical companies pursuing in order to maintain sustainable growth amidst the growing climate agenda? What new technologies are they focusing on? What state support measures can help to secure the successful implementation of projects in the sector and strengthen the Russian chemical industry’s competitiveness on the global market?

Moderator:
Denis Deryushkin — Deputy General Director - Head of Analytical Center, Russian Energy Agency of the Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Darya Borisova — Managing Director for Development and Innovations, SIBUR
Yakov Ginzburg — General Director, Chairman of the Management Board, Irkutsk Oil Company (INK)
Anton Maximov — Director, Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis. A.V. Topchieva of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Anton Rubtsov — Director of Oil Refining and Gas Complex Department, Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation
Maxim Ufaev — Partner, McKinsey & Company


October 13, 2021,
16:30 –17:45

Manege, –2nd floor, conference hall D

Power Engineering: Status of Gas Turbine Production in Russia

The manufacturing of Russian-made high-power gas turbines and the establishment of Russian-based engineering is one of the key milestones of the Russian power engineering industry. This achievement is another step towards ensuring the country’s energy sovereignty and will also improve the performance of thermal power plants once high-power gas turbines are introduced into the combined cycle of heat and electric power generation. However, it should be borne in mind that the development and production of high-power turbines is a complex technical challenge that involves not only the turbine itself, but also related areas. Since 2018, with the support of the Russian Ministry of Industry and Trade, a programme has been being implemented to revive the production of medium and large capacity Russian power gas turbines. What is the current status of this major turbine manufacturing project? How is cooperation with institutions and enterprises in the industry being organized? How will the production of high-tech components for the hot section of gas turbines be ensured? What solutions have been applied in key components of gas turbines?

Moderator:
Nikolay Rogalev — Rector, National Research University "Moscow Power Engineering Institute"

Panellists:
Evgeniy Grabchak — Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation
Mikhail Ivanov — Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Alexander Konyukhov — Chief Executive Officer, Power Machines
Mikhail Lifshitz — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Rotec
Vladimir Mikhailov — General Director, Polzunov Scientific and Production Association for the Research and Design of Power Equipment


October 13, 2021,
17:45 –18:30

Manege, 1st floor, Plenary conference hall

The Global Energy Prize Award Ceremony

The Global Energy Prize is an international award for outstanding research and scientific and technological developments contributing to improved efficiency and environmental safety in the use of the Earth’s energy sources in the interests of all humanity.

Awards are presented by:
Alexander Novak — Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation

Presenters:
Sergey Brilev — Anchor; President, The Global Energy Association
Daria Kozlova — Anchor, Russia 24 TV Channel

2020 award winners:
Yang Peidong — Director, The Kavli Energy NanoScience Institute (ENSI); Professor, University of California, Berkeley
Carlo Rubbia — Senior Professor, Gran Sasso Science Institute; Nobel Prize Laureate in Physics
Nikolaos Hatziargyriou — Professor, Division of Electric Power, National Technical University of Athens (NTUA)

2021 award winners:
Suleiman Allahverdiev — Head, Laboratory for Guided Photobiosynthesis, K.A. Timiryazev Institute of Plant Physiology of the Russian Academy of Science
Zinfer Ismagilov — Director, Institute of Coal-chemistry and Material Science of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science
Yi Cui — Director, Precourt Institute for Energy, Stanford University